Wednesday, 27 March 2013

Discussion: Growing Up Reading (and some recommendations)

Growing up, I was kind of the only reader in my family and my group of friends. I loved to read when I was younger but being the only reader, it wasn't the same as it is now so I didn't start reading loads until I was a teenager.

I grew up reading Point Horror books and Harry Potter and random ones I stumbled across myself (I remember reading Dracula when I was about 12), but I never really had any grown ups giving me books they thought I'd like (aside from assigned reading for school, which mostly sucked) and I didn't have any friends to talk about books with or get book recommendations from.

Now, I'm older and I love books, and I have a nephew and he loves to read too. He's really the only one in my family that loves to read the way I love to read, so I give him books (and it's really cute, sometimes he tries to let me borrow his books too).
Basically, my point is this: You should encourage children to read, and if they already love reading then you should nurture that. 

And, to go along with that point, here are some recommendations for younger readers (my nephew is 10, these are the books I've given him to read over the past year or so):

There are the obvious ones like Harry Potter and Diary of a Wimpy Kid (the latter being one he picked out himself and loves), of course. And I still maintain that Point Horror books are awesome.

1. A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snickett

2. The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordon

3. Matilda by Roald Dahl (but any of his books are good) - This is one of those books that 90's kids grew up reading, and it's one that can totally stand the test of time.

4. Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

5. The Poison Boy by Fletcher Moss

6. Chris Priestly books - I'm not sure which of these to recommend, since I've not read them, but I gave my nephew a bunch of them and he seems to really enjoy them. If you have/know a kid who is into ghost/horror stories, maybe check out some of these for him/her.

7. The Gorgon in the Gully by Melina Marchetta

8. Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy - This book is awesome (I read it a few years ago, so it's one of those ones that can appeal to older readers too). It's funny and it's fun and just...yeah. I really recommend this one.

9. Wonder by R.J. Palacio

10. Breadcrumbs by Anne Ursu

I've given him loads more, but those are the ones I remember.

Questions:

Were you a reader when you were younger? When did you really start reading?

Did you have any adults (or friends/siblings) in your life that encouraged you to read?

Is there any books you'd recommend for younger readers, books that can spark a love of reading in someone young?

Later.

p.s. On a completely unrelated note, my reading funk seems to have gotten much worse. I must have more than 20 books that are started but unfinished, it feels like it's been ages since I've finished a book. I just can't seem to concentrate, but as soon as I snap out of this, expect some reviews up (hopefully soon).

5 comments:

  1. Were you a reader when you were younger? When did you really start reading?
    *I began reading books for pleasure when I was six and I've been addicted ever since!

    Did you have any adults (or friends/siblings) in your life that encouraged you to read?
    *Many of my teachers were AMAZING, as were the librarians at all of my schools.

    Is there any books you'd recommend for younger readers, books that can spark a love of reading in someone young?
    *Anything by J.K. Rowling, R.L. Stein, Loius Sacher, Judy Bloom, and SO many more!

    ReplyDelete
  2. "Were you a reader when you were younger? When did you really start reading?"

    Probably sometime in early elementary school. And I think I was an avid reader as soon as I learned how to read. I remember being part of summer reading clubs in my local library in first or second grade, the kind where you get a free book for reading 20 books.

    "Did you have any adults (or friends/siblings) in your life that encouraged you to read?"

    My parents took my brothers and me to the library with the same amount of frequency that some parents take their kids to the playground. I feel like I was probably at the library at least once a week between first and eighth grades (after eighth grade I started buying more books!).

    "Is there any books you'd recommend for younger readers, books that can spark a love of reading in someone young?"

    Oof. Not a question I can answer. No single book will do it for everyone, as you probably know. I think my suggestion would just be to immerse the child in a reading-friendly, book-accessible environment and let him or her grab whatever interests them.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've always been a reader! My dad would always read me picture books of course, and then we moved on to the Junie B. Jones books which are fantastic and hilarious. I totally recommend them to younger kids (around 1st grade). I also loved the Magic Treehouse series. That and Junie B. were the first books I started reading on my own. My parents always encouraged me to read, and we would always go to the library and I could pick out my own books.

    I remember the first book I read and fell head over heels for was Kira Kira by Cynthia Kadohata. That was the first time I ever felt complete and total love for a book. I totally recommend it to girls in grade 5 or 6. Also, the Kiki Strike series is really good (though I've only read the first one I think) for girls in grade 5-8.

    This is such a great post - it's so, so important to put emphasis on reading when kids are young, and to encourage the love of reading!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've always been a reader and I grew up surrounded by books and with parents who also loved reading-I'm one of the lucky ones!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I was a reader when I was very young, but then again everyone in my family were readers. They still are. But around 8th grade I began to hate reading. Mostly because I was forced to read books I mostly did not enjoy in school. And books I found on my own were like Sweet Valley High, which I thought totally boring. Choose Your Own Adventure was okay, but I didn't have access to many. Then in college I fell in love with reading again and I am so glad. I think it is important, like you said, for parents and educators both to instill a love of reading in kids and continue to nurture it for their entire childhoods. Great post!

    ReplyDelete

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